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Goodwood Victorian ash

/ GoodWood Victorian ash in the Ruckers Hill House

The market’s best appearance grade timber

  • / Easy to work, cut, stain & build
  • / Straight lined edge
  • / Consistently blonde in colour
  • / Internally scanned for defects

There is something everlasting, warm and uplifting about Victorian ash in a residence or project. Something quintessentially Australian. It’s that connection that inspires us to create the markets’ most diverse range of timber products for use in residential and commercial applications.

It is well understood that Victorian ash is very easy to work, cut, stain and build with but we go much further. GoodWood Victorian ash is straight line edged after drying, is consistently blonde without the dark pink colours seen in other Victorian ash or Tasmanian oak, is internally scanned for defects and much, much more – see Our Difference or the Why Specify Goodwood blog for details. Our range of options has exploded into all of the timber aspects you need for the internal fit out for this reason. You can find them just about all around Australia which means the flow of design can carry on throughout your project.

Timber benefits

Stains well
Machines well
Blonde
Consistent Colour
Stored carbon
Low embodied energy
Sustainable resource
Very strong
Straight line edged

GoodWood Victorian ash Characteristics

Colour Blonde to straw
Grain Straight open and even grained with a uniform texture
Moisture Content Medium density 660 KG/m3 at 12% moisture content. Seasoned to comply with the Australian Standard AS2796 (9% – 14%) with the average moisture content ranging between 10% and 12%.
Impact Resistance High – 18 joules
Janka 4.9 kN (seasoned)
Unit Shrinkage (KD) Measurable movement in service – LowRadial: 0.22% of board dimension per 1% moisture content change.Tangential: 0.35% of board dimension per 1% moisture content change
Stability High (quarter sawn)
Cutting Very Good
Bending Satisfactory
Glueing Very Good
Lyctus Susceptible No
Nail holding Very Good
Durability Above ground – Class 3
Below ground – Class 4
(Refer to IronAsh for clear H3 treatment)
Fire Refer Australian Standard AS1530 Part 3 and Building Code of Australia
Ignitability index: 14
Spread of flame index: 8
Heat Evolved index: 7
Smoke development index: 3
Flooring AS/ISO 9239.1
Critical Radiant Heat Flux: More than 2.2kW/m2 and less than 4.5kW/m2
Smoke development Rate: Less than 750% -min
Wall and Ceiling lining AS/NZS3837: 1998
Average extinction area: less than 250m2/kgMaterial Group No: 3 (unless coated to meet Group 1 & 2)
Bushfire Attack level: BAL 19 High (BAL-29 and BAL-40 in proprietary systems)
Colour Blonde to straw
Grain Straight, open and even. Occasionally course grained or fiddle backed. Growth rings are visual and usually conspicuous
Moisture Content Medium density 680 KG/m3 at 12% moisture content. Seasoned to comply with the Australian Standard AS2796 (9% – 14%) with the average moisture content ranging between 10% and 12%.
Impact Resistance High – 18-20 Joules
Janka 5.7 kN (seasoned)
Unit Shrinkage (KD) Measurable movement in service – Low
Radial: 0.23% of board dimension per 1% moisture content change.
Tangential: 0.36% of board dimension per 1% moisture content change
Stability High (quarter sawn)
Cutting Very Good
Bending Satisfactory
Glueing Very Good
Lyctus Susceptible No
Nail holding Very Good
Durability Above ground – Class 3
Below ground – Class 4
(Refer to IronAsh for clear H3 treatment)
Fire Refer Australian Standard AS1530 Part 3 and Building Code of Australia
Ignitability index: 14
Spread of flame index: 8
Heat Evolved index: 7
Smoke development index: 3
Flooring AS/ISO 9239.1
Critical Radiant Heat Flux: More than 2.2kW/m2 and less than 4.5kW/m2
Smoke development Rate: Less than 750% -min
Wall and Ceiling lining AS/NZS3837: 1998
Average extinction area: less than 250m2/kgMaterial Group No: 3 (unless coated to meet Group 1 & 2)
Bushfire Attack level: BAL 19 High (BAL-29 and BAL-40 in proprietary systems)

Calculate Carbon Sequestration

Calculate the carbon sequestration of your project and the time it takes to regrow the timber.

0.0 kg
Total carbon captured
0.0 min
Growth rate
The figures for CO2 captured and growth rate used in this calculator were sourced from Wood Solutions, VicForests and AHEC.

Olaver Architecture

We often use Victorian ash for both its warmth and consistency. It’s a versatile timber which suits a myriad applications.

Sustainability

On a holistic level, our Victorian Ash is one of the best options once you include carbon sequestration, life cycle analysis, harvesting and regeneration.

Only 6% of Victoria’s total forest area is both suitable and allocated for harvesting and regeneration on an 80 year cycle. Less than 0.05% of the forest area is harvested each year (yes, that decimal point is in the right place). It is then regenerated. Not only that, but 100% of each log we receive is used by utilising off-cuts to make finger jointed products and using the sawdust as a carbon neutral green energy solution to power our kilns.

Learn more

Frequently asked
questions

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What is GoodWood?

GoodWood is ASH’s brand for Victorian ash. GoodWood was created so architects and designers get reassurance during specification that they’re getting a quality, consistent product all from ASH. So don’t forget to put the ‘GoodWood’ before Victorian ash!

What is Victorian Ash?

Victorian ash is an Australian hardwood made from two species of Eucalypt – Alpine Ash and Mountain Ash. GoodWood Victorian ash is a timber that’s internally scanned for defects, graded to high standards, straight line edged, stable with consistent moisture content, grain and colour and can be matched with the rest of ASH’s products.

Is Victorian ash the same as Tasmanian Oak?

Tasmanian Oak and Victorian Ash come from two near identical eucalypt species, E. Delegantensis and E. Regnans. Although they share many similarities, including species make up, there are some minor differences between Victorian ash and Tasmanian oak.

Tasmanian Oak can be one of E. Regans, E. Delegatensis & E. Obliqua (Mountain Ash, Alpine Ash & Messmate). This mix of hardwood species ranges from straw blonde to pale and dark pink through to chocolate blonde. The younger growth tends to be lighter in colour while the older trees can be darker across the spectrum. This is what gives Tasmanian Oak hardwood the larger variation in colour.

Both species are suitable for many of the same applications and are quite easily used in unison. The quality of species can depend on the timber mill, grading and their processes. 

Can you use Victorian ash outside?

Yes, Victorian ash can be used for external applications when treated to H3 classification. See the IronAsh page for more detail.

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